Back pain in pregnancy

//Back pain in pregnancy

Back pain in pregnancy

Back pain in pregnancy is a common problem – not surprisingly  because the change in posture alone can result in stresses being passed to tissues such as muscles and ligaments, which are not used to this amount of strain.  Consequently, these tissues protest – pain!

In the last few months a woman’s pelvis is preparing for the birth process: the ligaments slacken and allow more movement in the sacro-iliac joints and at the public symphysis. This makes these joints more prone to being strained, which can be very sore, making getting around very difficult.

The best advice in this situation is to get off to see an osteopath or other professional, who apart from easing the situation for you, will give you advice on the birthing process as well if you ask for it!

Getting comfortable in bed can be quite difficult. Most women end up lying on their sides. In this position, you may find it helpful to have a pillow between your knees to keep the pelvis level, and a thin pillow underneath your belly to stop yourself from rolling forwards with the weight of the baby.

Sometimes you will get back pain because the baby is lying awkwardly and pushing on something, creating pain. You may also get severe ‘sciatica’ if the baby lies on your sciatic nerve – try lying on the other side to encourage the baby to move over!

Do not make the mistake of believing that all pain in your lower back, pelvis or legs is due to the baby pushing on something.  If the pain is not relieved by changing position and getting the baby to shift around then consult an osteopath or other professional.

If you would like to talk to me about back pain in pregnancy call 0131 221 1415 and ask for Gavin.

By |2018-11-04T11:33:39+00:00December 17th, 2010|Uncategorized|0 Comments

About the Author:

Clinic Director and Osteopath. Gavin graduated as a Gold Medallist in 1991 and is now a Vice Patron of the British School of Osteopathy. Co-author of “The Back Book” with Gavin Hastings OBE in 1996, he has an MSc in The Clinical Management of Pain from the University of Edinburgh, and is currently working on a new book. He's passionate about helping to move people as far from illness and pain as possible, and in January 2015 set himself the target of helping a million people get a better back.

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