Is your desk the cause of your back pain?

//Is your desk the cause of your back pain?

Is your desk the cause of your back pain?

Yesterday I mentioned everyday things that cause back pain – today I wanted to focus on employee wellness and ask – is your desk the cause of your back pain?

Most people are not adequately supporting their back (neck and shoulders) because their chairs are not positioned correctly or they are not sat in the right position on their chair. So here are a few things you can do to help yourself.

Don’t slouch forward in your chair – this causes neck and shoulder problems – make sure your lower back is right up against the back of your chair and sit upright.

If typing is a large part of your job make sure you position your wrists correctly so they are in line with your forearms as you type. If you type with your wrists bent with your fingers on your keyboard correct this position immediately to avoid experiencing pain in your fingers and/or hands.

How high/low is your computer monitor – you must ensure that the top of your computer screen remains at eye level because looking at a screen that is too high or low will cause neck problems.

You might want to read about the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 2002

Below is a video no how to adjust your chair that you may find useful.

You can watch video 2 on adjusting your chair here

It is important you adapt your chair to suit you!

And video 3 provides more information on back support

If you are experiencing back, neck or shoulder ache I recommend you call our offices on 0131 221 1415 to arrange a consultation. You may also want to talk to your employer or HR department about introducing an employee wellness program because we often visit organisations in Edinburgh and talk to staff about their posture and how to ensure they work in a way that keeps them safe.

By |2018-11-04T11:33:25+00:00January 21st, 2011|Uncategorized|0 Comments

About the Author:

Clinic Director and Osteopath. Gavin graduated as a Gold Medallist in 1991 and is now a Vice Patron of the British School of Osteopathy. Co-author of “The Back Book” with Gavin Hastings OBE in 1996, he has an MSc in The Clinical Management of Pain from the University of Edinburgh, and is currently working on a new book. He's passionate about helping to move people as far from illness and pain as possible, and in January 2015 set himself the target of helping a million people get a better back.

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