//Which exercises are bad for my back?

Which exercises are bad for my back?

By |2019-03-04T20:32:55+00:00March 4th, 2019|Exercises for Low Back Pain|Comments Off on Which exercises are bad for my back?

Which exercises are bad for my back?” What a great question.  As an Edinburgh osteopath and committed exerciser I think I can give you a great answer.  You decide.  Whether you have had back pain / sciatica or not, a lot of this advice applies to you.

First, do you have back pain?

If you have back pain or sciatica currently, you should always be guided by the rule “Use it or lose it, but don’t abuse it” (UIOLIBDAI).  For more on the UIOLIBDAI rule see “What’s the quickest way to fix my lower back pain / sciatica?” .  Put another way, staying active is really important, but so is avoiding things that make your pain worse (that’s the “abuse it” bit).  If you do things that hurt, you are preventing your body from healing.

When exercises can be bad for your back

Exercise can be a very very good thing.  But it can also do you harm.  You’ve heard the term “over-use”?  Well, many of us struggle to find that sweet-spot where exercise is good and not bad.  Even good exercise can be a bad thing if you over-do it. Olympic swimmers often develop shoulder problems, and frequently end up with arthritic shoulder joints.  Rowers usually develop chronic lower back pain.  This is simply due to the effects of cumulative loading, without adequate rest periods.

Cumulative loading exercises can be bad for your back

There are 3 types of loading – peak, sustained and cumulative. Habitual exercise can lead to cumulative loading.  You may only be lifting 60% of your maximum possible weight, but if you do many repetitions, that leads to cumulative loading.  If you do it badly and/or you don’t have sufficient rest this will probably lead to tissue break-down and then pain.  Sufficient rest is key, because it’s during the rest periods that your body gets stronger. You don’t have to be lifting extra weight; body-weight exercises (like running and yoga) can count as cumulative loading.

Summary of “which exercises are bad for my back?”

  • Exercises that hurt at the time or within a few hours after exercising are bad for your back
  • Exercises that load your back to the point that it may eventually fatigue (without sufficient rest) and become painful are bad for your back

That’s it!

If you’d like a bespoke exercise plan, don’t hesitate to make an appointment with an osteopath in Edinburgh. We’re very experienced at exercise prescription and have over 50 exercises in our book on low back pain.

About the Author:

Clinic Director and Osteopath. Gavin graduated as a Gold Medallist in 1991 and is now a Vice Patron of the British School of Osteopathy. Co-author of “The Back Book” with Gavin Hastings OBE in 1996, he has an MSc in The Clinical Management of Pain from the University of Edinburgh, and is currently working on a new book. He's passionate about helping to move people as far from illness and pain as possible, and in January 2015 set himself the target of helping a million people get a better back.